Norway worst in Europe for Pneumonia and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

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Norway worst in Europe for Pneumonia and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

Norway is at Europe’s peak for the treatment of stroke, heart attack and various cancers, but in several areas Norwegian healthcare is in the bottom layer.

An Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) report, published in November, ranks health care among the 35 partner countries.

In a Norwegian comment report, signed by the Knowledge Centre of Public Health researcher, Ingrid Barring Saunes, the results are grouped into three parts to show how Norwegian healthcare is placed.

Norway is in the best group in several areas, including life expectancy at birth, and at 65 years of age. Infant mortality is low, while the Norwegians own estimated health is high.

Best in Cervical Cancer

Norway is also among the group of countries with the lowest mortality from stroke, heart attack and cancer.

‘The only country that has better results for treating heart attacks than Norway, is Italy’, said Ingrid Barring Saunes.

‘We are the country that has registered the highest survival in cases of cervical cancer, and we are just behind Sweden for ‘five-year survival’ in cases of breast cancer.

With colorectal cancer, Norway has a survival rate slightly above the average for EU countries’, said Saunes.

In the treatment of stroke, only Finland shows lower mortality in hospitals. Outside hospitals, Switzerland slips past Norway, but we are still among the best in Europe.

High levels of chlamydia and gonorrhea

But Norway’s state of health could be improved in several areas. We end up in the middle rank when it comes to incidences of cancer, the number of suicides, and the prevalence of HIV and syphilis.

Norway receives a bottom ranking when it concerns mortality from pneumonia and COPD.

We are also in the bottom layer in the incidence of measles, whooping cough, and hepatitis B, and the sexually transmitted diseases chlamydia, and gonorrhea (STDs).

Saunes emphasized that Norway’s health status is mainly good when compared to other European countries; not least in life expectancy.

‘The populations of Sweden and Norway expect the most years of good health. Elsewhere in Europe, the differences are large, with Baltic, Central and Eastern European countries scoring lowest’, she said.

 

Source: NTB scanpix / Norway Today

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