Australian boy rescued by an antidote for spider bites

Sydney funnel-webSydney funnel-web.Photo.wikimedia.org

A ten-year-old Australian boy who was bitten by a deadly spider, saved his life when he was given a record dose of  an antidote.

Matthew Mitchell helped his father to clean the shed when he was bitten in the finger of one of the world’s most poisonous spiders.

– The clawed stuck in me and crawled with all its feet and all around on my finger and I could not get it away, the boy told the Daily Telegraph.

The family wrapped a shirt around his arm to prevent the venom spreading and got him to hospital as soon as possible.

He survived after receiving twelve vials of antidote, which local media called Australian record.

The spider was captured and transported to the Australian Reptile Park, where it should be milked for venom to use in antidotes.

Australia has an astounding number of the world’s most dangerous creatures, including snakes, spiders, jellyfish and octopus.

A bite of the so called Sydney funnel-web, as the boy was exposed for, leads to death within an hour if not the victim get the antidote. But since the antidote was developed in the 80s, no deaths has been recorded.

 

Source: NTB scanpix / Norway Today

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