Going to map crack in the Pulpit Rock

Rich Chinese people leaving a lot of money in Rogaland Pulpit RockPreikestolen (the Pulpit Rock). Photo wikipedia.com

Geologists are going to map a crack in the Pulpit Rock

Geologists fear that the pulpit rock can fall down and thereby cause a flood wave. Now the half-meter wide gap in the famous tourist attraction will be checked out.

 

The multi-meter deep crack has been of concern ever since 1930. Even back then, bolts were inserted at both sides of the crack to measure any movement.

Now, the Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) will apply modern methods to investigate the Preikestolen in detail, writes Stavanger Aftenblad. Among other measures, the mountain north in the Lysefjord is scanned from different angles and high resolution photos from a helicopter are taken. Furthermore, a master student at NTNU will make 3D models of the surface as a foundation for a stability analysis.

The same newspaper in May reported that current measurements showed that the gap in the pulpit rock had expanded by 2-3 millimeters. That was the first change reported in 22 years.

Tidal waves

Researcher at NGU, Martina Bohem, explains that measurements of the crack have been performed before, but that they have been inaccurate.

– We assume that the Pulpit Rock has not moved lately. Nevertheless, equipment should be installed to detect any movement. Then we plan to pull out and check the crack occasionally. If we find that there is a danger of a rock fall, it will be appropriate to install permanent measuring equipment, says Böhme to the newspaper.

32 other mountains in Rogaland will also be reviewed by geologists. NGU carried out a reconstruction by helicopter in Rogaland last year where all possibly dangerous areas were identified.

– After that, we have chosen those who look the most dangerous and where the consequences might be the greatest, for further scrutiny. We are particularly concerned with mountains that are adjacent to the fjord and where tidal waves can be formed, she says.

 

© NTB Scanpix / Norway Today

 

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