Norwegian minister received free housing from the parliament by registering at his parents’ address: “I’m very sorry”

Kjell Ingolf RopstadPhoto: Marit Hommedal / NTB
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Christian Democrat (KrF) leader Kjell Ingolf Ropstad received free housing from the Norwegian parliament (Storting) by registering at his parents’ address. He did so even though he owned a home in Lillestrøm.

“We politicians manage the citizens’ trust, so even though I have not broken any rules, I am sorry, and I understand that people think I should have acted differently,” Ropstad told the newspaper Vårt Land.

On Sunday, the newspaper Aftenposten wrote that Ropstad received free housing from the Storting for several years by being registered with his parents until last year. He did so despite the fact that he owned a home in Lillestrøm – which he rented out.

“I had a hope and a goal to move out there and live next door to my sister and family. That was not the case. When we came to that conclusion, we sold the home,” Ropstad told Norwegian Broadcasting (NRK).

Ropstad: I followed the rules

He emphasized that he has followed the applicable regulations.

“Even though I have adhered to the rules, I understand that this is experienced negatively. I was unsure whether I could use the housing in central Oslo after I became a parliamentary representative in 2009, but have had an open dialogue with the Storting’s housing office about this,” Ropstad wrote in an SMS to NTB on Sunday night.

Prime Minister Erna Solberg (H) commented on the issue in an interview with NRK on Monday. 

“I understand that what he has done has been within the regulations that the Storting has. But at the same time, I think we politicians must be careful about using schemes in a way that they are not really intended for,” Solberg said.

Source: © NTB Scanpix / #Norway Today / #NorwayTodayNews

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1 Comment on "Norwegian minister received free housing from the parliament by registering at his parents’ address: “I’m very sorry”"

  1. The opposite of the “moral leadership” which is expected of someone especially in his position … so he should get out of it.

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