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The police spend ⅓ on 3% of its cases

Police Directorate SkulstadDirector of the Police Directoratem Håkon Skulstad.

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The police spend one-third of all resources on less than 3% of its cases

The police resources are largely spent on the most serious cases, such as gross violence and sexual abuse. The police use one-third of the available resources on less than three per cent of the police cases.


The concern emerges in a report made by the Norwegian Police Directorate. The police use one-third of their resources on shy of three per cent of the cases, according to its capacity survey, writes NRK.

The police see that there has been a clear increase in gross violence and considerably more sexual offences in recent years. The police believe that it lacks both expertise and capacity to meet this development in crime.

 


 

For profit crime levelled out

It, additionally, creates challenges that the number of cases in the area of for profit crime has levelled out.

“We have discovered cases of an extent that we could hardly have imagined. This has meant that the pile of untreated cases is increasing – even though we have added extra resources in this area,” Director of the Police Directorate, Håkon Skulstad, tells NRK.

“The situation is so demanding that it is not sufficient to provide more resources or increase capacity,” Skulstad believes.

State Secretary of the Ministry of Justice, Thor Kleppen Sættem (Conservatives), says that it may be necessary to review the rules and regulations.

“The big and complicated cases require such an incredible amount of police work, both in terms of investigation and prosecution.  We must, naturally, do something about that. The most important thing we can do is see if we can implement a set of rules that make it both smarter and easier to work on such cases,” Sættem concludes.


© NTB Scanpix / #Norway Today
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