The life expectancy in Norway

Marte Stokstad - Silje Reiten NordnesPhoto: Cornelius Poppe / NTB
Advertisements

The United Nations’ Human Development Index offers insights into the lives of humans across the world through a set of data parameters; one of which is life expectancy. Read on for details on the life expectancy of Norway and the other Nordic countries.

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a composite report measuring the following statistics: life expectancy, education (including literacy rates and enrollment levels), and per capita incomes by country.

We’ll be taking a look at life expectancies as outlined in the HDI’s 2019 edition, with a focus on Norway and the Nordic countries.

World life expectancy at birth is, on average, 72.56 years. The EU average is 80.9 years.

 The world survival rate to age 65 is 81.34% for women and 73.67% for men.

Here are the top 50 countries for life expectancy at birth in 2019:

  1. Hong Kong – 84.7
  2. Japan – 84.5
  3. Switzerland – 83.6
  4. Singapore – 83.5
  5. Spain – 83.4
  6. Italy – 83.4
  7. Australia – 83.3
  8. Iceland – 82.9
  9. Israel – 82.8
  10. Korea (Republic of) – 82.8
  11. Sweden – 82.7
  12. France – 82.5
  13. Malta – 82.4
  14. Norway – 82.3
  15. Canada – 82.3
  16. Ireland – 82.1
  17. Netherlands – 82.1
  18. New Zealand – 82.1
  19. Luxembourg – 82.1
  20. Greece – 82.1
  21. Portugal – 81.9
  22. Andorra – 81.8
  23. Finland – 81.7
  24. Belgium – 81.5
  25. Austria – 81.4
  26. Germany – 81.2
  27. United Kingdom – 81.2
  28. Slovenia – 81.2
  29. Denmark – 80.8
  30. Cyprus – 80.8
  31. Liechtenstein – 80.5
  32. Qatar – 80.1
  33. Costa Rica – 80.1
  34. Chile – 80
  35. Czechia – 79.2
  36. Barbados – 79.1
  37. United States – 78.9
  38. Lebanon – 78.9
  39. Cuba – 78.7
  40. Estonia – 78.6
  41. Maldives – 78.6
  42. Poland – 78.5
  43. Albania – 78.5
  44. Croatia – 78.3
  45. Panama – 78.3
  46. Dominica – 78.1
  47. United Arab Emirates – 77.8
  48. Uruguay – 77.8
  49. Oman – 77.6
  50. Slovakia – 77.4

What is the life expectancy of Norway?

So, Norway’s average life expectancy at birth is 82.3 years.

Per World Bank data for 2018, the male life expectancy in Norway is 81.1 and the female life expectancy in Norway is 84.4.

Norway is 14th in terms of life expectancy out of 188 countries in the HDI – and it’s 1st in terms of “Human Development” overall, per the index.

Survival to age 65 in Norway is 92.97% for women and 89.10% for men – according to World Bank data for 2018.

Family with parents and children
Norway enjoys a high comparative life expectancy. Photo: Jessica Rockowitz / Unsplash

What are the life expectancies of the other Nordic countries?

Denmark life expectancy

The life expectancy in Denmark is 80.8 years. 

The male life expectancy in Denmark is 79.10 and the female life expectancy in Denmark is 83.4.

Denmark is 29th in terms of life expectancy out of 188 countries in the HDI – and it’s 11th in terms of “Human Development” overall, per the index.

Survival to age 65 in Denmark is 91.21% for women and 86.23% for men.

Finland life expectancy

The life expectancy in Finland is 81.7 years. 

The male life expectancy in Finland is 79.10 and the female life expectancy in Finland is 84.6.

Finland is 23rd in terms of life expectancy out of 188 countries in the HDI – and it’s 12th in terms of “Human Development” overall, per the index.

Survival to age 65 in Finland is 92.98% for women and 86.23% for men.

Iceland life expectancy

The life expectancy in Iceland is 82.9 years. 

The male life expectancy in Iceland is 81.3 and the female life expectancy in Finland is 84.3.

Iceland is 8th in terms of life expectancy out of 188 countries in the HDI – and it’s 6th in terms of “Human Development” overall, per the index.

Survival to age 65 in Iceland is 93.70% for women and 90.88% for men.

Sweden life expectancy

The life expectancy of Sweden is 82.7 years. 

The male life expectancy in Sweden is 80.9 and the female life expectancy in Sweden is 84.1.

Sweden is 11th in terms of life expectancy out of 188 countries in the HDI – and it’s 8th in terms of “Human Development” overall, per the index.

Survival to age 65 in Sweden is 93.42% for women and 89.94% for men.

Causes of death in Norway

Norway has among the lowest rates of death in Europe from preventable diseases (and well below the EU average), which is a sign of an efficient and well-functioning healthcare system.

Norway also invests the most in its healthcare system than any country in Europe. 

Norway’s cancer survival rates are among the highest in Europe, as well:

  • Prostate cancer in Norway 93%, Europe 87%
  • Breast cancer in Norway 87%, Europe 83%
  • Colon cancer in Norway 65%, Europe 63%
  • Lung cancer in Norway 18%, Europe 15%

The average lengths of stay in the hospital in Norway are just over 6 days, while the EU average is just under 9 days.

The highest health risk factors in Norway are:

  1. Dietary risks – which are tied to 15% of deaths
  2. Tobacco – which is tied to 15% of deaths
  3. Low physical activity – which is tied to 3% of deaths
  4. Alcohol – which is tied to 1% of deaths

The ten leading causes of death in Norway are:

  1. Ischemic heart disease
  2. Alzheimer’s disease
  3. Stroke
  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  5. Lung cancer
  6. Lower respiratory infection
  7. Colorectal cancer
  8. Prostate cancer
  9. Falls
  10. Atrial fibrillation

In conclusion

All in all, it’s safe to say that Norway and the Nordic countries rank much higher than average on a global scale in terms of life expectancy.

No one can be 100% sure why, but a contributing factor could be the combination of health factors in the region which includes lots of fresh air, outdoor activities, and fresh seafood fare.

Hiking hiker
Hiking is a common activity in Norway. Photo: Geir Ormseth / Pixabay

Source: Norway Today

Advertisements

1 Comment on "The life expectancy in Norway"

  1. OlafrGlucksburg | 9. November 2020 at 11:04 | Reply

    Fascinating article read and might I just add look at the two beautiful young girls in the picture. True beautiful young Norwegian women. Now can one really say there is beauty on this level else where. I think not.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*