Housing costs in Norway: These are the ten most expensive municipalities to live in

Housing real estatePhoto: Gorm Kallestad / NTB
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Oslo has the highest housing costs in Norway for a single-family home of 120 square meters. The average is NOK 165,266.

That is an increase of 12.71% from 2018 (NOK 146,624) to 2019. By comparison, the average inhabitant of Norway has to pay NOK 116,392 a year.

Here’s the list of the ten most expensive municipalities to live in (the change compared to 2018 is written in parentheses) based on the costs for a single-family home of 120 square meters:

  1. Oslo: 165,266 kroner (12.7%)
  2. Bærum: 150,229 (9.4%)
  3. Nesodden: 134,985 (12.1%)
  4. Lørenskog: 132,968 (12.1%)
  5. Frogn: 131.571 (3.2%)
  6. Nordre Follo: 130,839 (7.1%)
  7. Asker: 130.675 (9.1%)
  8. Lillestrøm: 128,594 (11.4%)
  9. Nittedal: 126.594 (9%)
  10. Vestby: 124,167 (8.7%)

Small sums separate the other big cities in Norway. 

The people of Bergen pay NOK 122,548 for housing costs, while the inhabitants of Tromsø pay NOK 122,013 on average. 

In Trondheim, they have to pay NOK 120,913. The cheapest municipality is Lavangen in Troms, where housing costs last year amounted to NOK 82,013.

Spike in housing costs

“With this index, the Huseierne organization shows that the government-determined costs of living have increased sharply in recent years. 

“We expect the government, the Norwegian parliament (Storting), and the municipalities to contribute what they can to slow down this development so that ordinary people don’t get even higher housing costs,” Secretary-General Morten Andreas Meyer at Huseierne said.

The organization also created a tool where the user can enter the municipality name and get information about the municipality they are looking for.

Further cost increase from 2021

The company Samfunnsøkonomisk Analyse made a forecast for households’ housing costs for the period 2020–2023.

In 2021, growth in the housing cost index is expected to be 2%, 3%in 2022, and 6% in 2023. 

The housing cost index is expected to have a clear decline of 12% in 2020. 

That is due to lower interest costs, energy costs, and property taxes.

Despite the decline in the housing cost index, municipal taxes are set to increase by 6%, maintenance costs by 4%, and insurance by 3%.

© NTB Scanpix / #Norway Today

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